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Practicing patience

"Patience is the art of hoping."  Luc de Clapiers

There are times when I am out photographing that I have to force myself to be patient. About a month ago, I was coming back from my morning kayak and getting close to the location where I get out of the water, when I spotted this Snowy Egret. I hadn’t spent much time being close to a Snowy in a while, so I diverted my direction and headed towards the bird. At first the bird was not in very good light, I almost left the area, but I saw it was heading to a more interesting spot, so I decided to sit and wait. As usual, whenever I am sitting and watching animals, I engage them in conversation. I was telling the egret how beautiful it was and asking it to meander a bit to my left so it could get in better light...See more images and read the rest of the story below.

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Neat Image Noise Reduction

There are times and circumstances where you just need to use high ISO with your digital camera. Cameras all vary on how good they are with high ISOs. Fortunately for all photographers, cameras have gotten much better over the years. But even with the best cameras there are still times when you wish you could eliminate noise from your images and still retain sharp detail. I have found Neat Image works great for this. Read the blog and watch the video.

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Increasing Depth of Field for Telephoto Lenses

It is always difficult to get good depth of field when photographing with telephoto lens. Especially when photographing subjects that are not very far away from you.

I was photographing an iguana in Florida with my lens at 600mm. It was impossible to get both the iguana and the leaves on the tree in focus. At first I was so busy making sure I was getting the iguana’s eye in focus, I didn’t even notice the out of focus leaves.  But when viewing the image on the LCD they were glaringly apparent. Watch the video to see how I solved the problem.

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A different look

I have over 5,000 images of Great Blue Herons (I know I am a hoarder) and in that number are quite a few images of them in flight...But while I was photographing this heron, it made a sudden and rapid descent into the top of a tree, where it settled to perch...On the way down it twisted and turned in some amazing poses. And for me created some unique images I had never captured before. Check them out here.

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About

LEWIS KEMPER is widely recognized as a photographer, writer, and instructor, lecturing throughout the United States. To learn more, click here.

 

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